How to create connections for your book

vv 004 Nicelle and I get so hungry!

Where do we find books and book lovers? I fell in love with my husband in a bookstore. I taught my daughter to read in a bookstore. I taught my son the fine art of bribery—how to beg for comic books—in a bookstore. I discovered most of the great books that I now love in bookstores.
The intersection between book buyer, books and the cashier used to take place almost exclusively in bookstores. They were a place of discovery. For many of us there are no bookstores within easy reach and that place of intersection has become the internet.

Here is a list of sites where we learn about what books we might want to read:

Cultural Weekly
Bookslut
Salon
Huffington Post
NPR
Millions
NY’s Book
The Awl
Paris Review
HTMP
A Public Space
Rumpus
Slate
Wow Owow
The iVillage
The Daily Beast
Jezebel
National Books Critic Circle
However, as much as I like all these sites; there’s no substitute for word of mouth. What we as publishers and writers need to do is create a buzz about books that means everyone is talking about the book. We might start by talking about the book ourselves. If there’s a book you want to have everyone talking about it, start talking about yourself. The Love Affairs of a Nathanial P by Adelle Waldman is such an example. Like George Saunders, The Tenth of December, it’s one of those books that just jumps off the book shelf and grabs you by the throat because everyone is talking about it. Waldman’s book is about a young author who gets arrogant after he gets a publishing contract. He gets arrogant with women, and a lot of women who read the book will think, “Ah, I’ve met lots of men like this before.” Some will even get angry, but most will want to keep reading. It’s a book that the editor, publicist and writer worked tirelessly to talk about with everyone, and that effort has paid off. It’s become a book with a buzz around it.
The best thing the publisher or writer can do to sell books is to get the conversation going about the book and then keep it going as long as possible. Let the book resonate out into the world of ideas. Start the conversation going yourself. You’re going to need the internet to keep that going. The internet allows you to create waves like dropping a rock in the water. You set up a reading, and you announce it on social media, that creates ripples and waves of conversation about that book.

The intersection might happen in cyberspace but it begins in real space. It begins with the writer, the editor, the marketing director, the publicist. Everyone at the press should be talking about the books the press is pushing out there into the world. The conversation begins with you.

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Published in: on October 29, 2013 at 2:52 pm  Leave a Comment  
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