Ireland is all about stories

ll 020 I loved this donkey

Joan Didion wrote about her year of magical thinking. We should all have a week, a month or a year of magical thinking, just hopefully not after our loved one has died. It’s no accident that her year of thinking differently happened when her husband and daughter had died because it takes big change to shake us loose from living our lives in exactly the same way every day, from being stuck in our ways and being unable to see ourselves and the world in which we live differently.

Habits at home:

1. I check email constantly and try to answer all email immediately.

2. I wait on writing projects until I have “a lot of time” and that lot of time doesn’t happen often enough.

3. I don’t exercise enough.

4. I think/worry/stress too much about stuff I cannot change.

5. I don’t get enough sleep.

New habits I’ve gotten used to in Ireland that I hope to carry home.

1. Checking my email once a day.
2. Writing in huge blocks of time.
3. Walking
4. Thinking about writing instead of thinking about stuff I cannot change.
5. Get enough sleep

Changing the scenery and changing the game helps to change the habits. But for changing habits to be permanent takes a lot of work. If you’re Joan Didion and you are rich and live in NY and have people to do all the little things for you, it’s going to be easier to be a writer.

For those of us who still have to work, it gets a mite more difficult. Work interferes with creative life. It interferes with sleep, sex, the life of the imagination, what can I say of work except that for most of us it is necessary to keep us indoors. And even in California where the sun shines year round, no one really wants to live out of doors. Here in Ireland, it would be downright depressing what with the rain an d all.

We’ve been having good Irish food here. We had this fish/rice dish for dinner that was very interesting and for dessert there was a pink sugary kind of situation which was also very interesting. And there was chicken roast and cauliflower one night that was delicious.

But we are sustained here no doubt, there is really good Jameson, and there is Baileys and Guinness which sustains the whole country of Ireland keeping them from floating out to sea. The Irish I feel on Guinness and potatoes.

This place where we’re writing continues to amaze me. There is an English bulldog named Ruby who is very cute and she lugs herself along, no easy task, her legs appearing pint size compared to her vast bulk, and her tongue hangs out to the side.

Great conversations at dinner: Movies and books. We’ve been comparing Pride parades Minneapolis to San Francisco, lesbian boxers at Pride in the SF, the gay men in the full monty vs the more sedate Target shopping gays of the Twin Cities. Why we need Obama care and health insurance at companies large and small. Race, politics, money, the shortage of money, the housing market, the over abundance of houses on the housing market, unions, gays, straights, presidents, liars, lawyers, lovers and writers.

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Published in: on June 26, 2013 at 5:21 am  Comments (1)  
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  1. “If you’re Joan Didion and you are rich and live in NY and have people to do all the little things for you, it’s going to be easier to be a writer.

    For those of us who still have to work…”

    Didion wrote her first novel while holding a full-time job. “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” are collections of magazine pieces she wrote *for* work. If she’s rich, it’s because she earned it–and anyway she’s 78.


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